Friday, December 7, 2012

Playa de Palma Evolution


LAYERS OF STYLE

As you apply touches over effects, layers over style, your goal is to achieve a balance in which the overall message is clearly that which you'd chosen to send. That's the sea, a mile or so away as the osprey flies, reflected in an old Moroccan bone inlay mirror

We've been doing a little gardening lately as you can see. I hope living room palms are easier than orchids, which we've found a bit tricky.

The osprey makes regular visits and sits on our balcony railing and gazes, with his yellow eyes,  into the room above. He seems to like it.


14 comments:

ArchitectDesign™ said...

comfortable and stylish -a perfect tropical getaway!

johnhunter said...

really like the place ! please show us more; i have a place in ft lauderdale & always interested in seeing how other people do their condos ...

Mark D. Ruffner said...

You have managed to create a space that is both bold and serene — lovely!

Dean Farris said...

Paul, it's fresh and clean, and very handsome!
Good job! When's the party?

columnist said...

It's certainly coming together beautifully. I'm interested that you have orchids indoors - so do we, but we have the palms outdoors, on the balconies. I too have a black glazed Chinese (fishbowl) pot which sometimes houses about twenty or so tall orchid plants.

Gardener in the Distance said...

A beautiful apartment - the orchids lend it tranquility.
The green and the orange together is so rarely done, but what POW they have!

lindaraxa said...

Paul,

There's nothing to orchids if you know what to do. Once a week, put them in the sink and run water through them. Leave them there until water stops dripping from under. Return to their place. They like lots of light which you have.

lindaraxa said...

BTW, you can tell by the leaves how they are doing and if they are happy where they are. Yours look ecstatic!

Reggie Darling said...

Very handsome, indeed. Serene is a word that come to mind. As for orchids. I gave up long ago trying to keep them once their gorgeous blooms have faded and fallen away. Since their display usually lasts a month or more, I consider them to be a lovely plant to enjoy during their show, and then I dispose of them once they are through. Today, with orchids widely available and reasonably priced here in the US, I no longer have the pangs of guilt that I did when they were relatively rare and dear. I once visited a house in Coral Gables where the owner had a marvelous collection of them, but he lived their year-round, so was able to care for them appropriately. Reggie

Vittoria Gallacci said...

The perfect living room Paul. Really well done!
Kisses from Lucca.

Vittoria.

Anonymous said...

You've done a wonderful job on your interiors, and those paintings you found in a previous post are stunning.

In terms of the orchids, I've had a tendency to kill them when brought inside, but I've managed to keep one alive for several months. I bought it at Whole Foods, and the checkout clerk told me a lady had told her to put one ice cube in it a week. I tried that and was concerned about using an ice cube, but so I have only been watering mine, and not to excess, about once a week. So far it likes it. It also likes a bright sunny spot, but not direct sun. Maybe this will help you with yours.

pve design said...

Gorgeous.
pve

Anonymous said...

A bit of architectural criticism here, in reaction to the images you show: It seems to me that the cornice molding over the window wall (where it serves as a box to house / conceal the curtain rod or track) should not be treated as a continuation of the cornice molding that wraps around the rest of the spaces. There seems something visually 'brittle' about this juncture -- implausible, unconvincing. It seems to me that the whole would have been more successful had the molding covering the curtain box been treated as an entirely independent element from the cornice that tops the visually 'solid' walls.
It seems to me that in this sort of spatial prototype (a generally very 'closed' and well defined space, opening fully and totally and dramatically on one side, with the purpose of capturing a powerful view) that there should be no pretense that one is dealing with a traditional, four-sided 'room'. Therefore, that 'fourth wall' might instead be treated as the visually 'light' mere 'screen' that it in fact represents.
It might be treated as a 'free' element 'inserted' within the flanking, 'solid' and space-defining walls.
Now, what exactly would this mean in the context of what to do here? Possibly as small a detail change as giving the window wall curtain box cornice a 'return' at both of its ends where it would 'meet' the lateral 'solid' walls -- and perhaps additionally painting this element a subtly or strongly different color (both strategies would work) to declare this and bestow this element an independent decorative dignity or integrity, rather than subsuming it into a 'perceptual' "structural system", a visually most uncomfortable arrangement. Fortunately the recommended modification to the curtain box can be made at no great cost, and implying no great disruption to the already well-settled and realized scheme. This is a small 'tweek' -- but a crucial one to think about to arrive at a fully rationalised and convincing as well as fully 'poetic' spatial solution in this particular setting.

P.Gaye Tapp at Little Augury said...

I love your ability to focus-make the impact and then the tide recedes. All else with your inherent good taste is twaddle. Now do you decorate for the holiday-or perhaps a wassail recipe is all you need. pgt